Centering Prayer

Apologetics

Centering Prayer

By Matt Slick
Christian Apologetics and Research Ministry

Centering prayer is popping up within the Emergent Church Movement.  Centering prayer, also known as contemplative prayer and listening prayer, is the practice of relaxing, emptying the mind, and letting oneself find the presence of God within.  It involves silence, stillness, patience, sometimes repeating something (mantra), and the practice of “not knowing” as the person seeks God’s presence. Continue reading →

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Centering Prayer: What Is It? Is It Dangerous?

Apologetics

Centering Prayer: What Is It? Is It Dangerous?

By Brian Mason
Beacon Apologetics

A term and action being pushed by the Emergent Church Movement is called ‘centering prayer’ or ‘contemplative prayer.’ It is practiced by ‘emptying the mind,’ ‘stillness,’ and, in many cases, repeating something to feel God’s presence. It is based on occult and Eastern religious practices. Emptying the mind is not Christian as it opens up the Christian to demonic influences. Continue reading →

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Handling the Word Deceitfully (Part 7)

Ecclesiology
Bibliology
Hermeneutics

“Therefore seeing we have this ministry … [and] have renounced the hidden things of dishonesty, not walking in craftiness, nor handling the Word of God deceitfully … we preach not ourselves but Christ Jesus the Lord” (2 Corinthians 4:1-5).

Paul and his ministers were honest and did not handle the Word of God deceitfully, but not all ministers have such scruples. I’ve been rehashing how Mark, a balmy Bible teacher (a senior citizen, by the way), steadily maligned the Patriarchs, made sinners out of saints (God’s chosen and elect people), and lied about God’s prophets. Continue reading

Handling the Word Deceitfully (Part 6)

Ecclesiology
Bibliology
Hermeneutics

“Therefore seeing we have this ministry … [and] have renounced the hidden things of dishonesty, not walking in craftiness, nor handling the Word of God deceitfully … we preach not ourselves but Christ Jesus the Lord” (2 Corinthians 4:1-5).

Paul and his ministers were honest and did not handle the Word of God deceitfully, but not all ministers have such scruples. Mark, the balmy Bible teacher I’ve been talking about, has been steadily maligning the Patriarchs, making saints (God’s chosen and elect people) out to be sinners. Continue reading

Handling the Word Deceitfully (Part 5)

Ecclesiology
Bibliology
Hermeneutics

“Therefore seeing we have this ministry … [and] have renounced the hidden things of dishonesty, not walking in craftiness, nor handling the Word of God deceitfully … we preach not ourselves but Christ Jesus the Lord” (2 Corinthians 4:1-5).

Paul and his ministers were honest and did not handle the Word of God deceitfully, but not all ministers have such scruples. Mark, the balmy Bible teacher I’ve been talking about, has been steadily maligning the Patriarchs. Continue reading

Handling the Word Deceitfully (Part 4)

Ecclesiology
Bibliology
Hermeneutics

“Therefore seeing we have this ministry … [and] have renounced the hidden things of dishonesty, not walking in craftiness, nor handling the Word of God deceitfully … we preach not ourselves but Christ Jesus the Lord” (2 Corinthians 4:1-5).

Paul and his ministers were honest and did not handle the Word of God deceitfully, but not all ministers have such scruples. Mark, the balmy Bible teacher I’ve been talking about, has been arrogantly maligning the people of God, speaking evil of good and good of evil. Continue reading

Handling the Word Deceitfully (Part 3)

Ecclesiology
Bibliology
Hermeneutics

“Therefore seeing we have this ministry … [and] have renounced the hidden things of dishonesty, not walking in craftiness, nor handling the Word of God deceitfully … we preach not ourselves but Christ Jesus the Lord” (2 Corinthians 4:1-5).

Paul and his ministers were honest and did not handle the Word of God deceitfully, but not all ministers have such scruples. Continue reading