Stormed and Taken*

Bibliology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“And Abimelech got up to Mount Zalmon” (Judges 9:48).

We read, “And Abimelech got up to Mount Zalmon, he and all the people that were with him, and Abimelech took an ax in his hand, and cut down a bough from the trees, and took it, and laid it on his shoulder …. And all the people likewise cut down every man his bough, and followed Abimelech, and put them to the hold, and set the hold on fire on them; so that all the men of the tower of Shechem died also, about a thousand men and women” (Judges 9:48, 49). Continue reading

Windows Toward Jerusalem*

Bibliology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“His windows being open and his chamber toward Jerusalem” (Daniel 6:10).

The scoundrelly princes of Persia, urged on by political jealousy against Daniel, succeeded in getting a law passed that anyone who prayed to God would be put under the paws and teeth of the lions, who were lashing themselves in rage and hunger up and down the stone cage, or putting their lower jaws on the ground, bellowing till the earth trembled. But the leonine threat did not hinder the devotion of Daniel, the Coeur de Lion of the ages. Continue reading

The Lord’s Razor*

Bibliology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“In the same day shall the Lord shave with a razor that is hired, namely, by them beyond the river, by the king of Assyria” (Isaiah 7:20).

The Bible is the boldest book ever written. There is no similitude in Ossian, Iliad, or Odyssey so daring. Its imagery sometimes seems on the verge of the reckless, but it only seems so. The fact is that God would startle, arouse, and propel men and nations. A tame and limping similitude would fail to accomplish the object. Continue reading

Posthumous Opportunity*

Bibliology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“If the tree fall toward the south or toward the north, in the place where the tree falls, there it shall be” (Ecclesiastes 11:3).

There is a hovering hope in the mind of a vast multitude that there will be an opportunity in the next world to correct the mistakes of this world; that, if we do make complete shipwreck of our earthly life, it will be on a shore up which we may walk to a palace; that, as a defendant may lose his case in the Circuit Court, and carry it up to the Supreme Court or Court of Chancery and get a reversal of judgement in his behalf, all the costs being thrown over on the other party, so, if we fail in the earthly trial, we may in the higher jurisdiction of eternity have the judgement of the lower court set aside, all the costs remitted, and we may be victorious defendants forever. Continue reading

Vicarious Suffering*

Bibliology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“Without shedding of blood is no remission” (Hebrews 9:22).

John Greenleaf Whittier, the last of the great school of American poets that made the last quarter of a century brilliant, asked me in the White Mountains, one morning after prayers, in which I had given out Cowper’s famous hymn about “The Fountain Filled with Blood,” “Do you really believe there is a literal application of the blood of Christ to the soul?” Continue reading

The Queen’s Visit*

Bibliology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“Behold, the half was not told me” (1 Kings 10:7).

King Solomon had resolved that Jerusalem should be the center of all sacred, regal, and commercial magnificence. He set himself to work, and monopolized the surrounding desert as a highway for his caravans. He built the city of Palmyra around one of the principal wells of the East, so that all the long trains of merchandise from the East were obliged to stop there, pay toll, and leave part of their wealth in the hands of Solomon’s merchants. Continue reading

The Pleiades and Orion*

Bibliology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“Seek Him who made the Seven Stars and Orion” (Amos 5:8).

Amos of Tekoa plowed the earth and threshed the grain with a new threshing-machine. To take from it its bitterness, before it fully ripened, he scarred the sycamore tree with an iron comb, then gathered its fruit. Like his father, he herded sheep and worked the fields, but it would be wrong to think of him as a mere rustic. Living, as he did, along a major thoroughfare in that part of the world, where men from many nations passed through, he was wise in the ways of the world and cosmopolitan with a global world view—knowing and being known by Philistines, Syrians, Phoenicians, Moabites, Ammonites, Edomites, and Israelites. Continue reading